THE REAL MUSIC CLUB PRESENTS…

Northern Ireland’s premier promoter of roots and Americana music. We have been operating since 1998.

Eric Taylor – Thursday 24th September – The Errigle Inn
Tom Russell – Friday 25th September – The Errigle Inn
Tom Russell – Saturday 26th September – Flowerfield Arts Centre
Jeff Finlin – Thursday 1st October – The Errigle Inn
Steve Forbert – Monday 12th October – The Errigle Inn
Gretchen Peters – Friday 16th October – Fitzroy Church
Steve Earle & The Dukes – Friday 23rd October – Limelight 1

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Eric Taylor The Errigle Inn
Belfast
Thu 24 Sep 2015, 8:45PM 50+ tickets
available
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Tom Russell The Errigle Inn
Belfast
Fri 25 Sep 2015, 8:15PM 7 tickets
available
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Tom Russell Flowerfield Arts Centre
Portstewart
Sat 26 Sep 2015, 8:00PM 9 tickets
available
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Jeff Finlin & John Murry The Errigle Inn
Belfast
Thu 1 Oct 2015, 8:45PM 50+ tickets
available
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Steve Forbert The Errigle Inn
Belfast
Mon 12 Oct 2015, 8:45PM 50+ tickets
available
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Gretchen Peters Fitzroy Church
Belfast
Fri 16 Oct 2015, 8:00PM 26 tickets
available
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Steve Earle & The Dukes Limelight
County Antrim
Fri 23 Oct 2015, 8:00PM 50+ tickets
available
Book now
Book Now

Eric Taylor is a sage musician, a lyrical genius and a master of the guitar. If you’re familiar with the intricate Texas singer/ songwriter jigsaw puzzle, you probably already know a lot about Taylor. If you’re not familiar with Taylor by name, you’ve probably heard his songs performed by people such as Nanci Griffith and Lyle Lovett. He has created a multitude of fans and devotees that are legends themselves in the singer/songwriter realm, artists who have long considered Taylor to be a teacher and a lantern bearer whose time is long overdue.


“To say that Eric Taylor is one of the finest writers of our time, would be an understatement,” Nanci Griffith says. “If you miss an opportunity to hear Eric Taylor, you have missed a chance to hear a voice I consider the William Faulkner of songwriting in our current time.” Griffith has recorded several of Taylor’s songs, including “Deadwood,” “Storms,” “Dollar Matinee” and “Ghost in the Music,” which they wrote together. Lyle Lovett, who has recorded Taylor’s “Memphis Midnight/Memphis Morning,” “Whooping Crane,” “Understand You,” and with whom Taylor co-wrote the immensely popular “Fat Babies,” compares Taylor’s narrative voice to that of Bruce Springsteen. Iain Matthews claims, “Once you become a Taylor fanatic, it gives one immense joy and pride to be able to enlighten others to the man’s work.”

Taylor learned intricate blues guitar stylings from music legends Lightnin’ Hopkins, Mance Lipscomb and Mississippi Fred McDowell while working at the Family Hand club. Later, he developed his own unique guitar picking style, that would be imitated by many of his contemporaries from the early Houston days, such as Guy Clark, Townes Van Zandt, Robert Earl Keen, Lyle Lovett, Steve Earle, and Nanci Griffith. “There were no lines drawn in the sand between musical genres in Houston back in those days,” Taylor remembers. “You were just a musician. I believe so many great writers came out of that scene because you could learn from others. Isn’t that the point of this whole thing?” To this day Steve Earle still calls Eric Taylor his teacher!

 

Tom Russell’s new 52 Track, double record “The Rose of Roscrae” – A Ballad of the West, was released in April …with guest artists: Johnny Cash, Leadbelly, Ramblin’ Jack Elliott, Guy Clark, Dan Penn, Gretchen Peters, Ian Tyson and dozens of others…the reviews are piling in:
“The Rose of Roscrae: A Ballad of the West is the third in a series of extraordinary concept albums Tom Russell has delivered…yet another masterwork. It is a work of rare ambition and rare brilliance that is beautifully and artfully executed…Tom’s performances are riveting throughout the long piece. So, too, are the other singers who take on various roles in the folk opera…There is an embarrassment of riches among the songs Tom composed for The Rose of Roscrae…Mike Regenstreif, Folk Roots”


“Russell’s Roscrae masterpiece, as well as his back catalogue, totally outstrips (so much of) the music by contemporaries that masquerades as (Americana.) He open heartedly understands that historic context and musical tradition are inextricably linked….Approached very much in the panoramic spirit of classical composer Aaron Copland…Celtic blood courses through this writer’s veins, and the sonically colourful melodies and richly poetic images embedded throughout The Rose Of Roscrae are the stuff of hair-raising chills and joyous optic moisture. Arthur Wood, No Depression, April 2015”

Please note that Roscrae is not a spelling mistake! The main character in the folk opera, Johnny Dutton, is dyslexic!

 

Jeff Finlin was born in Cleveland, Ohio, the grandson of Irish railroad workers (who seemed to be in the habit of leaping from trains). Jeff Finlin is a fascinating, unique artist. His career has taken many twists and turns.
He began with wanderlust, traveling America using every form of transportation, with the exception of rickshaw (still on the bucket list). Having played in bands in Boston, Ohio and L.A, he finally wound up in Nashville with long-time mate and Academy Award nominee Gwil Owen (“A Softer Place to Fall”) to form the rock band “the Thieves”, which released the acclaimed “Seduced by Money”, produced by Marshall Crenshaw on Capitol Records. In 1993, he went on to produce the self-released “Lonely Light” before going on to produce the Little Dog/ Mercury release, “Highway Diaries”.


In the spring of 2013 Jeff Released the epic “My Moby Dick” along with an extensive book of prose Titled “Time Less Travel”. Peter Cooper of the Tennessean Said of the record-
“Some folks come to Nashville, amble over to Music Row and look for a cookie-cutter solution. Hand Jeff Finlin a cookie cutter, and he’s liable to melt it down and then forge it into something sharper and more dangerous.”

Steve Forbert as a young man from Meridian, Mississippi, Steve Forbert to New York City and playedguitar for spare change in Grand Central Station. He vaulted to international prominence with a folk-rock hit, “Romeo’s Tune,” during a time when rootsy rock was fading out and the Ramones, Talking Heads and other New Wave and punk acts were moving in to the public consciousness. Still, critics raved about Steve’s poetic lyrics and engaging melodies, and the crowds at CBGB’s club in New York accepted him alongside those acts. “I’ve never been interested in changing what I do to fit emerging trends,” Forbert observes. “Looking back on it, I was helping to keep a particular American songwriting tradition alive at a time when it wasn’t in the spotlight.”


After his first two records came a plethora of well-crafted, unforgettable songs on such albums as Little Stevie Orbit, Streets of This Town, The American in Me, Mission of the Crossroad Palms and Evergreen Boy. His tribute to Jimmie Rodgers, Any Old Time, was nominated for a Grammy Award in 2004. In October 2012, 35 years after his first album, Steve has released an exciting new one, Over With You. Its ten fresh but mature songs pinpoint a wide range of emotions that colour personal relationships — emotions that most listeners have undoubtedly felt and struggled to understand at some point in their lives. “This is an album that has taken a lifetime to make,” explains Forbert. “You don’t just pull these songs out of thin air — you have to live them.”

 

Gretchen Peter’s new album, “Blackbirds”, features three songs co-written with Ben Glover and is probably her best work of what has been a long career.

“I get a lot of juice from the musicians in the room,” says Gretchen Peters.

In the case of her new album, Blackbirds, “juice” is certainly understatement. Recorded in Nashville, the album features a who’s who of modern American roots music: Jerry Douglas, Jason Isbell, Jimmy LaFave, Will Kimbrough, Kim Richey, Suzy Bogguss and more. But it’s not the guests that make Blackbirds the most poignant and moving album of Peters’ storied career; it’s the impeccable craftsmanship, her ability to capture the kind of complex, conflicting, and overwhelming emotional moments we might otherwise try to hide and instead shine a light of truth and understanding onto them. Blackbirds is, in many ways, an album that is unafraid to face down mortality. But rather than dwell on the pain of loss, the music finds a new appreciation for the life we’re given.

“During the summer of 2013 when I began writing songs for Blackbirds, there was one week when I went to three memorial services and a wedding,” remembers Peters. “It dawned on me that this is the way it goes as you get older – the memorial services start coming with alarming frequency and the weddings are infrequent and thus somehow more moving. You understand the fragility of life, and the beauty of two people promising to weather it together.”

 

Steve Earle hardly needs an introduction to the Northern Irish audience as he always has made Belfast a regular stop on his tours. Throughout his more than 30 year career, Earle has mined the rich veins of American roots music from country to rock and roll, folk and rockabilly.


On his 16th studio album of his singular career, Terraplane, Earle pays tribute to the blues, influenced by the blues giants he saw growing up in Texas –Lightnin’ Hopkins, Freddy King, Johnny Winter, Jimmie and Stevie Ray Vaughan, Canned Heat and Billy Gibbons.
Recorded in Nashville by Ray Kennedy and produced by R.S. Field, the new collection is his homage to the music that he calls “the commonest of human experience, perhaps the only thing that we all truly share” and a ecord he has wanted to make for a long time. Over 11 original tracks, Earle and his band The Dukes traverse various forms of the blues–from the Texas roadhouse blues of opener “Baby Baby Baby (Baby),”to the acoustic country blues of “Ain’t Nobody’s Daddy Now” and the Chicago blues of “The Usual Time ” to the pre-war blues of “Baby’s Just As Mean As Me, ” a duet with Eleanor Whitmore.
The electrified “King of The Blues ” features some scorching guitar playing from guitarist Chris Masterson ” and on “The Tennessee Kid” Earle sounds like a possessed street preacher as he retells the Faustian crossroads legend over a John Lee Hooker-esque boogie.
Described by Mojo as “Earle’s passion for blues in its rawest form,” Terraplane has been receiving rave reviews with Uncut choosing it as their “Americana Album of the Month” and London’s Express & Star exclaiming “It’s like Robert Johnson meets Johnny Cash –and it’s a truly stunning work.” Rolling Stone awarded it three and half stars and called it “less a soul-searcher than a sturdy vehicle, built to chug through hard times,” while Vintage Guitar remarked, “In a time when far too many modern ‘blues’ records feel antiseptic and slick, Earle and band superbly integrate new songs and old sounds”

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